ACONQUIJA NATIONAL PARK

FLORIAN VON DER FECHT

Ecosystem:

Yungas forest, high Andes and the ecotone between these ecosystems.

Area:

70.000 hectares.

Important Conservation Attributes:

The water courses that descend from the heights to the plains are the source of water for thousands of inhabitants of the region. There are several threatened and endangered species that live here, like the ocelot, the puma and the Taruca deer (or North Andean deer), also found here are Incan ruins of worldwide importance.

Aconquija National Park

The Aconquija Sierra is formed of mountains rising over 6000 meters in height. Their altitudinal gradient has resulted in landscapes that range from snowy peaks and glaciers, through high altitude meadow and grasslands to forests and jungle, generating an oasis of high biodiversity in the center of the country. 

Several species of endemic plants are found here, more than 600 species of birds and threatened animals like the ocelot, puma, collared peccary and the Taruca deer. In addition, there are dozens of Incan ruins scattered throughout the area of the park, some of them being of worldwide importance, such as the “Ciudacita” ruins and remains of the Inca Highway.  

MONTE LEON NATIONAL PARK

ANTONIO VIZCAÍNO – Tompkins Conservation archive.

Ecosystem:

Patagonia steppe, marine coast and the meeting of these two ecosystems.

Area:

67,591 hectares.

Important Conservation Attributes:

The park has one of the most important colonies of Magellanic penguins in the country and also contains threatened species like the puma and guanaco.

Monte Leon National Park

Monte Leon National Park is the result of collaboration between the Foundations Vida Silvestre Argentina, CLT Argentina and Conservación Patagónica —the last two organizations created by Doug and Kris Tompkins. This protected area was created by Argentine law in 2004 after around 72,000 hectares were donated, making it the first coastal National Park in Argentina. Guanacos, pumas, southern rheas and a number of small mammals inhabit its arid grasslands, typical of Patagonia steppe, while one can find vast colonies of Magellanic penguins and sea lions along its coastline. In the interior of the park, important fossil beds with remains of birds and mammals are also protected.

THE EXPANSION OF

PERITO MORENO NATIONAL PARK

ANTONIO VIZCAÍNO – Tompkins Conservation archive.

Ecosystem:

Patagonia steppe and forest.

Area:

15,000 hectares.

Perito Moreno National Park Expansion

In 2014, CLT or The Conservation Land Trust —the foundation created by Doug and Kris Tompkins— donated 15,000 hectares contiguous to Perito Moreno National Park to the government of Argentina. These lands, which had been part of the El Rincón ranch, provide one of the most spectacular views of Mount (or Cerro) San Lorenzo. The Lácteo River brings pure glacial waters to the magnificent beech forests on the edges of the massif.

The conservation work over the last years has shown important improvements in the health of the grasslands and forests, including recent sightings of the Huemul deer, a species in danger of extinction, now returned to the area.